Posts Tagged ‘blogs’

Social Networking Communities (MySpace and Facebook)

October 23, 2008

October 23, 2008

“Social Networking Communities (MySpace and Facebook)”

Many marketers are now discovering the importance and value of online social networking communities. Facebook and MySpace are great social networking tools that people can use to promote or sell their service, product, or message.  Different people will use various networking sites in a variety of ways. It is quite possible for someone to utilize a combination of networking sites in order to achieve their goals. The most important thing to remember when dealing with social networking sites is the ability and need to connect to people. Here we will examine some of the ways that marketers can utilize theses networking tools to their advantage. 

 

MySpace

MySpace and other social networking tools give the marketer a built-in audience to sell to. Dotty Blake in his blog suggests that digital products are the easiest to sell online since there is no shipping charges or hassle.  In his blog he outlines what he think are the necessary steps that need to be taken in order to use both clickbank.com and MySpace to sell your product.  He suggests treating each MySpace profile like a person and to give each profile person-like characteristics.  He actually suggests setting up numerous profiles and making each profile an “actress or actor”. For example, he says if you were to sell a quit smoking product on your MySpace page, then you would initiate a blog about your product and other people (actors or actresses) would start to comment, and that would hopefully initiate conversation among actual visitors.  He says that on affiliate profiles you could even have the actors or actresses suggest the product by posting comments such as “yes I had the same problem till I discovered this book”.

 

Facebook

Brian Wallace at Nowsource.com  compiled some tips and suggestions on how to fully take advantage of Facebook. He emphasis the importance of facebook’s applications, such as Blog Friends where you can add in your friend’s blogs as well as friends of friends. He also makes note of RSS feeds.  You can put other website feeds on your Facebook profile, which is great for small businesses and entrepreneurs.  Justin Smith is the author of “The Facebook Marketing Bible”. His blog is a synopsis of this book. For anyone wanting to use Facebook to the fullest this blog if not book ,is definitely a useful read. Smith states that the most important part of utilizing Facebook is your profile page, because that is where your audience gets to engage with certain parts of your identity. He admits that the profile page is where you can express your passion for you brand, company or product. Smith explores every possible application of Facebook. Some of the less traditional Facebook applications that he examines include:

Social Ads:   With Social Ads, Facebook offers advertisers the option to pay on a CPC or CPM basis, whichever they prefer.

Integrated Opportunities: if you represent a large account, Facebook has partnered with Microsoft to serve advertisers wit higher campaign budgets.

Polls: polls offer an easy way for marketers to quickly conduct research within their targeted audience.

Finally Smith admits that Facebook marketing campaigns will require much more creativity than any other SEM campaigns. Facebook provides brand marketers the opportunity to design immersive and persuasive brand experiences.  Some of the success of Facebook should be credit towards its instant feedback nature, where user’s activity is constantly being updated and displayed.

 

Whichever social networking tool(s) you decide to use it is important to note that these tools are effective because they are personal yet non-intrusive.  If your audience consists of young people then Myspace may be the tool for you. If you plan on creating a Myspace profile consider leveraging third party services to bring multimedia content (i.e. flash widgets) onto your page. The fore mentioned piece on Myspace was merely an example of how one could use the Myspace to sell or promote a product but certainly not the only option available.  If you plan on using Facebook or Myspace or a combination of the two, it is important to remember that creativity and need to connect to people are two of the most important success factors. There is presumably more research online about how to fully utilize facebook and MySpace then could be fixed into this blog.

 

 

 

 

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Building Community within your Website

October 9, 2008

October 9th, 2008

“Building Community Within you website”

The notion of customer experience in e-commerce refers to targeting a customer’s perception & interpretation of all the stimuli encountered while interacting with a firm. There are 7 C’s to effectively building and maintaining a customer experience: context, content, community, customization, communication, connection and commerce. Here we will focus on community and explore some underlying methods of building community within your website.

Community refers to how sites build relationships between users. Strong community encourages stickiness and loyalty. Some examples of the way firms can build communities in their websites are: support forums, discussion/message boards or forums, member areas and blogs. Basically, building community is a way for users of your site to connect and communicate with each other. We will now look explore some of the tools used to build community in particularly discussion/message boards and blogs.

One article about discussion/message boards  examines the several advantages of a message board over an email list or instant chatting.  One of the advantages that stood out in the piece was the fact that past and present messages on a message board are readily viewable. This means that evidence of quality participation and a large group of participants is necessary to encourage more visitors to contribute.  The task then here is developing topics that drive traffic to the conversation.

Blogs can be a great way to encourage users to participate in your website and remain engaged with your websites content. However, professional blogger for Viral Garden, Mark Collier, has a some very interesting points and suggestions made in his article about blogging. He suggests that there is a big difference between blogging and expecting people to participate, and actually creating a viral community within your website. Some of the few blogs he links to include: Jack Yan’s “The Persuader Blog”, Clyde Smith’s “Hip-Hop Marketing”, and Toby Bloomberg’s “The Diva Marketing Blog”.

Priya Shah, a partner at a search engine marketing firm, in her article “How to build Traffic to your Blog”, states that “Write and they will come” isn’t exactly a magic formula to bring in traffic by the boatload. In her article she has 8 points of consideration for anyone wishing to build community through a blog.

  1. Write posts that People will Want to read
  2. Optimize your Post for Search Engines
  3. Submit your blog and RSS feed to directories
  4. Ping the Blog Service
  5. Build Links to Your blog
  6. Edit Your Blog Posts into Articles
  7. Create buzz about your blog
  8. Capture Subscribers by Email

Alot of things must be taken into consideration when implementing tools to build community and keeping that community together. Justilien Gaspard, at SerachEngineWatch.com discusses various aspects about building community in his article. He states that that a viral marketing campaign, whether it be blogging, forums, or discussion boards, or any combination of tools, has a greater likelihood of success by having specific objectives and targeting communities. There are no guarantees with viral marketing, he admits. Finally, he states that if it doesn’t succeed, explore what you can improve on, what you’ve learned and put that new knowledge into another campaign. He says at the very least you developed some relationships with people to promote your next vial marketing initiative. Building viral communities in your website is a good way to bring a group of people (your customers) together that share common interest(s), who can generate content to your website, and feel that they are an important and integral part of what you are offering.